We met with the other Troy, from Legacy Renovation who is repairing the existing windows, and Katie and Mark, from Schuchart/Dow, to talk about the windows and screens.  They had put screens in two windows to show us what they look like and we hated them – ugly and permanent –  so we wanted to talk about custom screens that would look better and be removed when not needed. He described how they’d work and look and they should be much better, so he’s going to work up an estimate for them. They’ll be more expensive, of course, but we only need them on the bedroom windows. We also talked about his shop drawing for the new window in the kitchen – looks good – and hardware on the windows.

Attic with all skylights in

Then we talked to Tim from the HVAC people to talk about locations for thermostats. There will be 7 (!) thermostats in the house: one for the radiators throughout the house, one for the kitchen + family room in-floor radiant heat, one for the basement in-floor radiant heat, two for  the radiators in our offices, one for the radiant floor in the master bedroom and one for the 2nd kids’ bathroom radiant floor. Some thermostats have remote sensors now, so we can locate the thermostat where it’s hidden (there’s no such thing as a good-looking thermostat) and have a remote sensor installed almost invisibly in the walls. So, except in our offices where there is no place to hide them, all the thermostats will be hidden from view.

Then we walked around with Bill, the electrician, to double-check switch and outlet locations. We didn’t make many significant changes except we decided to control the two walkways to the bathroom from the master bedroom independently. We also agreed with the lighting guy about adding two can lights in the dining room to light the table better.

The roofing guys were finishing up the skylights and this was the first time we got to see the attic with all the skylights in. Even on the cloudy day the attic felt almost like it had no roof on it at all. I’m really happy with the amount of light in there now, but now I’m concerned that it will get too much light and be too hot in the summer. I hope we can get good airflow from the ceiling fans and open windows up there. I also have to admit that I was wrong and Tom Kundig was right about how the cross-ties there will look – the light from above really shows off the grain in the wood and they look a lot more interesting than I was expecting. They should stand out even more once the pitched roof is drywalled and painted.